Other books by Andrew McGahan

Wonders of a Godless WorldWonders of a Godless World

Suspend disbelief and immerse yourself in an electrifying, tumultuous work of the imagination – a powerful and apocalyptic tale of madness and revenge, desire and devastation, you’ll be swept from the beginning of time to the end of the earth.

On an unnamed island, in a Gothic hospital sitting in the shadow of a volcano, a wordless orphan girl works on the wards housing the insane and the incapable. When a silent, unmoving and unnerving new patient – a foreigner – arrives at the hospital, strange phenomena occur, bizarre murders take place, and the lives of the patients and the island’s inhabitants are thrown into turmoil. What happens between them is an extraordinary exploration of consciousness, reality and madness.

Winner of the 2009 Aurealis Award for Best Science Fiction Novel

UndergroundUnderground

Blistering, brilliant, corrosively sharp and blackly comic – Underground is the novel that at least half the country has been waiting for.

Think ahead five or so years from now, to an Australia transformed by the never-ending war on terror. Canberra has been wiped out in a nuclear attack. There is a permanent state of emergency. Security checkpoints, citizenship tests, identity cards and detention without trial have all become the norm. Suspect minorities have been locked away into ghettos. And worse – no one wants to play cricket with us anymore.

Enter Leo James – burnt-out property developer and black-sheep twin brother of the all powerful Bernard James, Prime Minister of Australia. In an event all too typical of the times, Leo finds himself abducted by terrorists. But this won’t be your average kidnapping. Instead, vast and secret forces are at work here, and Leo and his captors are about to embark on a journey into the underworld of a nation gone mad.

Like some bastard child of Dr Strangelove and George Orwell, Underground is both an adrenalin-pumped thriller and a gleefully barbed satire that takes a chainsaw to political neo-correctness and Australia’s new ultra-nationalism. Blistering and blackly comic, this book goes straight to the heart of the country’s future – and it isn’t pretty.

The White EarthThe White Earth

One spring day in late 1992, when William was halfway between his eighth birthday and his ninth, he looked out from the back verandah of his home and saw, huge in the sky, the mushroom cloud of a nuclear explosion. He stared at it, wondering. The thunderhead was dirty black, streaked with billows of grey. It rolled and boiled as it climbed into the clear blue day, casting a vast shadow upon the hills beyond. But there was no sound, no rumble of an explosion. William was aware of the smell of burning…  but it was a good smell, a familiar smell. The smell of grass, of wheat, of the farm itself.

His father dead by fire and his mother plagued by demons of her own, William is cast upon the charity of his unknown uncle – an embittered old man encamped in the ruins of a once great station homestead, Kuran House. It’s a baffling and sinister new world for the boy, a place of decay and secret histories. His uncle is obsessed by a long life of decline and by a dark quest for revival, his mother is desperate for a wealth and security she has never known, and all their hopes it seems come to rest upon William’s young shoulders. But as the past and present of Kuran Station unravel and merge together, the price of that inheritance may prove to be the downfall of them all. The White Earth is a haunting, disturbing and cautionary tale.

The White EarthWinner, The Miles Franklin Award 2005

Winner, 2005 The Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, South East Asia and South Pacific Region WC

Winner, National Year of Reading 2012, Queensland

Winner, 2004 The Age Book of the Year (fiction)

Winner, 2004 The Courier Mail Book of the Year Award

Shortlisted, 2004 Queensland Premier’s Liteary Awards

Shortlisted, 2006 Festival Awards for Literature (SA) Award for Fiction

Longlisted, International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2005

Last Drinks

Last Drinks

It’s closing time in the Queensland underworld. Last Drinks is brilliant, suspenseful and masterfully written.

It’s a decade since the infamous Inquiry into corruption tore the state of Queensland apart. But for George Verney, disgraced journalist and bit-player in the great scandals of his day, the Inquiry has never quite finished. After ten years of self-imposed exile, drawn by the terrible death of a man who was his friend, he reluctantly returns to Brisbane, the city of his downfall. In a town he no longer recognises and through an underworld that has forgotten him, George must seek out the other hidden survivors of his times, to confront the truth about their common past.

Last Drinks, fast moving, funny and shocking, is a lament for all that can go wrong not only in the life of one man, but in the life of an entire state. This is crime fiction that transcends the genre . . . It’s a truly compelling and stylish novel, seamlessly written.’
— Debra Adelaide, Sydney Morning Herald

Winner of the Ned Kelly Award for Best First Crime Novel

Shortlisted, Age Book of the Year

Shortlisted, QLD Premier’s Literary Award

19881988

‘A lighthouse. A weather station, thousands of miles away. For six months. I drank steadily. With alcohol it all made sense.’

It’s the Bicentennial year and for Gordon failed writer and bottleshop boy it seems his life is going nowhere. It’s time to escape. From his overcrowded house, from Brisbane, from Expo 88, from everything. He stumbles into Wayne who has connections in Darwin and the promise of work. So the two of them head north toward swamps and crocodiles, in search of inspiration, and of their rightful place in the culture of Australia.

1988, McGahan’s second novel, is a prequel to his best-selling debut, Praise.

‘The pre-eminent Australian road novel.’
The Australian

PraisePraise

The bestselling Vogel Award-winning novel about sex, drugs and alcohol – and and about being young in Australia.

Praise is an utterly frank and darkly humorous novel about being young in the Australia of the 1990s. A time when the dole was easier to get than a job, when heroin was better known than ecstasy, and when ambition was the dirtiest of words. A time when, for two hopeless souls, sex and dependence were the only lifelines.

‘McGahan’s book is a bracing slap in the face to conventional platitudes and hypocrisies.’
–The Australian

Praise is one of those books that takes a hefty bite out of a piece of subject matter, chews it to a pulp and then spits it out.’
–Peter Craven

‘A tour de force . . . revelation of life in the slow lane of drugs and sex and alcohol.’
The Weekend Australian

Winner, the Australian/Vogel Literary Award

Winner, Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book in the Pacific Region

Shortlisted for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award, the Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature and the Canada-Australia Literary Award